Monday, May 13, 2013

Gleanings : : Media Overload . Kids' Cash . Gluttons . Sex Stats


Enlightening reading here in this week's Gleanings ...

When to Take a Social Media Step Back
'When this thing called social media came around, we didn’t get a manual.  We weren’t equipped for how life would require we engage in it or be sorely left behind…how the rules would be left up to our own discrepancy and that sometimes, our better judgement ...'

'Pinterest stress' afflicts nearly half of moms, survey says
'For many moms, social media is both a blessing and a curse.  We go to sites like Pinterest and Facebook for connection and inspiration – but all too often, the beautiful images of domestic harmony make us feel inadequate.  In our exclusive TODAY Moms survey of 7,000 U.S. mothers, 42 percent said that they sometimes suffer from Pinterest stress – the worry that they’re not crafty or creative enough.  Symptoms include staying up until 3 a.m. clicking through photos of exquisite hand-made birthday party favors even though you’ll end up buying yours at the dollar store, or sobbing quietly into a burnt mess of ...'

Teaching Young Children to Manage Money
'Some of us were raised in homes where financial responsibility was modeled, but others of us have had to learn the hard way.  If we want our children to start learning some of the financial principles that we may not have grasped until we were adults, it’s best to begin before bad habits become ingrained!  Here are a few basic guidelines for the journey ...'

The Socially Acceptable Sin
'Most Christians today like to say that all sins are “equal” in the eyes of God, that there is no scale of less or worse sins, that a white lie or a homicide alike would have been enough to require Christ to die on the cross.  We say this in theory, but in practice, we know that a white lie won’t get you kicked off the church leadership team.  And a homicide likely will.  In practice, there are some sins that are socially acceptable, even in the Church.  There’s one sin in particular that has pervaded our society and churches so silently we hardly give it a second thought, and that is the constant hunt for more over what is enough.  Or, in an uglier terminology, what is known as gluttony ...'

The Sex Lives of Unmarried Evangelicals
'80 percent of young unmarried evangelicals have had sex?  Really? ...'






linking up with my counseling/coaching/blogging buddy, Beth

8 comments:

  1. This was an interesting selection. The Pinterest and Social Media posts echo thoughts I've had about both of these subjects.
    The Socially Acceptable Sin was incredibly eye opening. I have been trying to curb my eating and cravings. I eat because I want something or eat too much because I enjoy the taste as opposed to just eating to fuel my body.

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    1. Thanks for weighing in {no pun intended!} on the posts that hit home for you, my online friend!

      Linda

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  2. I've never heard the Pinterest survey, but I find it very interesting. Funny how we love things that make us feel inadequate. We definitely live in a world at war with Biblical values and we often don't even see it.

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    1. Wow, Gail - 'funny how we love things that make us feel inadequate.' Lots of food for thought there, my friend ...

      Liinda

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  3. I love that you've compiled some great resources and statistics for us here, Linda. They are very compelling. I agree with the whole Pinterest stress thing. I saw another blog do a photo presentation of failed Pinterest projects. It was funny and I thought brought some realism to the discouraged and average Pinterest follower. I'm coming back to check out the links, but I'm grateful for all that you've pointed out here and also am honored that you gave me more than a link back at the end of your post. Hugs to you, my counseling/coaching/blogging buddy!

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    1. Yeah, the whole social media thing is really taking a toll, Beth ... I expect to see this only increase as we spend more and more time obsessed with our screens.

      Sad, yes?

      Linda

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  4. Interesting gleanings, especially on the "Socially Acceptable Sin." Excess and dissatisfaction: how can we keep these temptations from "misdirecting" our desire for excellence?

    ~A

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    1. mmm ... good question, A! Our pursuit of excellence should spring from our deep desire to honor Christ instead of bringing attention to ourselves ...

      Now - to do that!

      Linda

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Welcome to the table, friend!

This is where we gather and hang out. I'd love for you to pull up a chair and jump right into the conversation. Or simply say 'hello.'

l'll be dropping in to visit you sometime soon ...

Linda

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